Drug War Casualty: The Bill of Rights and Constitutional Liberty

by Anthony Gregory, LewRockwell.com

The following is based on a talk given at the Free State Project’s Liberty Forum in Nashua, New Hampshire, on Friday, March 6, 2009.

The Tenth Amendment says “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.” This effectively means that if the Constitution does not grant the power to the federal government over something, then it is for the states and people to decide. Some people here would say this is the most important amendment. If the federal government obeyed it, the entire drug war as we know it would be impossible.

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The Liberty Amendment

by Dr. Archie Jones, The American Vision

No fundamental provision of the Constitution or the Bill of Rights is more neglected—or thoroughly violated—today than the Tenth Amendment. It is violated in spirit and in practice. Its violation is advocated implicitly and explicitly: in the teaching of American history and government, in legal theory, in what passes for “Constitutional Law,” and in the functioning of everyday American politics and government.

Our Constitution—as the very words of the Tenth Amendment make clear—was intended to be a delegated powers document. The states which formed and ratified the Constitution were free and independent states—nations—which delegated certain authority and powers to the new central or national government created by the Constitution. They delegated—and manifestly intended to delegate—only those powers stated in the Constitution: and no more. They forbade themselves certain other powers which they also stated in Article I, Section 10 of the Constitution.

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Rohrer, Folmer Plan Rally on Monday to Defend State Sovereignty

Pennsylvania Lawmakers encourage supporters to join them at Capitol event

Politicians in Washington, D.C., have been exerting undue influence on the states and it’s time for them to stop. That’s the sentiment behind a rally Rep. Samuel E. Rohrer (R-128) and Sen. Mike Folmer (R-48) will hold at noon on Monday in the Capitol Rotunda.

“If you think the size and scope of the federal government has far exceeded our Founding Fathers’ intentions, then we hope you come out Monday to support our cause,” Rohrer said. “For too long, Congress and the president have been encroaching on policy areas that ought to be decided by the states. This rally is the equivalent of posting a ‘no trespassing’ sign.”

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The Basics of Sound Government

by State Rep. Dick Harwood, Idaho-St. Maries

It might seem strange that the Legislature is considering action to declare Idaho’s sovereignty under the 10th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. State sovereignty should be a given.

Yet, it isn’t. “Change” is the latest buzzword in politics; that’s what President Obama campaigned for when he ran for office and since he took office in January. He wants “change” in the political climate in Washington and “change” in how business is conducted.

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The Nature of Change

by Justin D. Lowry, Georgia Conservative Weekly

Change is inevitable, and not all change is bad just as not all change is good. Government is a collection of law. Politics uses philosophy and theory. The way to test these is to compare them to events in history. If something didn’t work 100 years ago, it will not work now.

To put state sovereignty to this test, you will see that it worked for around 90-100 years. The Articles of Confederation clearly expressed states rights, and the Constitution gives states levels of autonomy.

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Hypocritically Correct

by Brad Berner

Amendment X  The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

Hypocrisy and politicians! There is nothing new in this love-match made by Cupid’s arrow of self-interest, right? Wrong, in the current flurry of state legislatures passing or considering resolutions asserting state sovereignty, many politicians are doing the right thing for the wrong reasons.

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Mississippi: Reinforcing the 10th Amendment

On March 5th, 2009, legislators in Mississippi introduced House Concurrent Resolution 69 (HC0069) to “reinforce the fundamental principle and authority of State Sovereignty under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution…”

Steven Palazzo is the principle author of the resolution along with 29 additional authors – find status updates here.

Here’s the full text of the resolution:

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