One by One: Returning to the Constitution

The 10th Amendment to the US Constitution embodies much of what the founders envisioned for this country – a federal government strictly limited to only specific activities, with the rest being handled on state or local levels.

Some may call this states’ rights, others refer to it as decentralization or federalism.  Whatever you call it, it’s a system of government where politicians in Washington D.C. wouldn’t have the power to dictate to you how to live your life.



States Rights Alive in California

Gay Marriage, Medical Marijuana, the Environment and more.

For many years, presidents have been assuming more and more power for themselves and for the federal government, but California has been taking the lead recently in the battle for States Rights against this growth Federal power.

Thomas Elias notes this trend in his recent Pasadena Star-News article, “California a key states’ rights battleground.” 


Federalist #14: Strictly Limited Government

It’s commonplace these days for the government and its courts to consider the 10th Amendment to be nothing more than a “relic” – basically, not having any effect, or limiting the power of the federal government in any way.

These politicians and bureaucrats ignore the plain words of the 10th in an effort to grant themselves more and more power – at the expense of our incomes and our liberty.

A simple reading of Federalist #14 shows that the founders (even those accused of wanting too much federal power) understood that a Constitution was written as a strict limit on the power of government – and not as a grant of unlimited powers.


Seventeen Things Only

When considering the 10th Amendment, it’s essential to understand its purpose. In reading it, one sees quite clearly that its effect is to limit the powers of the federal government to those specifically listed in the Constitution – and give the rest to “the States, respectively, or to the People.”

But why is this a good thing?


The Double Trouble of Taxation

by Rep Ron Paul

Taxes were on the forefront of many Americans’ minds this week as they scrambled to meet the April 15th deadline to file their returns.  Tax policy in this country hurts taxpayers twice – once when they pay taxes, and then when the government spends the money.  Americans are sick and tired of the financial burden and the endless forms to fill out.

To add insult to injury, after collecting this money the government does some very detrimental things to the economy.


Why we have a Tenth Amendment

Guest Commentary by Dan Reale

You can ask anybody what the first amendment prevents infringement upon. They might know about one thing, freedom of speech, but incorrectly, tell you we are granted freedom of speech. Even then, most miss the other four inalienable rights the Constitution limits the federal government from violating.

Most are equally unaware of the right of the people to keep and bear arms, and even of their status as militia under U.S. code. Most also don’t know that the third amendment prevents forced slumber parties with soldiers, and further assume that one’s right to be secure in his papers, person and effects can be waived by law – without a rebellion or invasion. They also believe that the seizure of life, liberty or property is okay without a warrant, just compensation or due process is legal.


Limits vs Empowers

by David Smith

In response to “The Constitution and the Right to Privacy

The only point that I would add is that there exists a fundamental difference between the Federal Government, which these amendments limits, and the State Governments, which the 10th Amendment empowers.  Actually, ’empowers’ is not the right term because power not delegated is ‘reserved.’  That would entail that it (supposedly) never left the States in the first place!