Rohrer, Folmer Plan Rally on Monday to Defend State Sovereignty

Pennsylvania Lawmakers encourage supporters to join them at Capitol event

Politicians in Washington, D.C., have been exerting undue influence on the states and it’s time for them to stop. That’s the sentiment behind a rally Rep. Samuel E. Rohrer (R-128) and Sen. Mike Folmer (R-48) will hold at noon on Monday in the Capitol Rotunda.

“If you think the size and scope of the federal government has far exceeded our Founding Fathers’ intentions, then we hope you come out Monday to support our cause,” Rohrer said. “For too long, Congress and the president have been encroaching on policy areas that ought to be decided by the states. This rally is the equivalent of posting a ‘no trespassing’ sign.”


The Basics of Sound Government

by State Rep. Dick Harwood, Idaho-St. Maries

It might seem strange that the Legislature is considering action to declare Idaho’s sovereignty under the 10th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. State sovereignty should be a given.

Yet, it isn’t. “Change” is the latest buzzword in politics; that’s what President Obama campaigned for when he ran for office and since he took office in January. He wants “change” in the political climate in Washington and “change” in how business is conducted.


Hypocritically Correct

by Brad Berner

Amendment X  The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

Hypocrisy and politicians! There is nothing new in this love-match made by Cupid’s arrow of self-interest, right? Wrong, in the current flurry of state legislatures passing or considering resolutions asserting state sovereignty, many politicians are doing the right thing for the wrong reasons.


Alaska Resolution: Sovereignty Under the 10th Amendment

Legislators in Alaska introduced House Resolution 9 on 02-25-09.  It reads:

WHEREAS the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States reads,  “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people”; and

WHEREAS the Tenth Amendment defines the total scope of federal power as being that specifically granted by the Constitution of the United States and no more; and


Jefferson’s Arguments for Nullification and Limited Government

by Gennady Stolyarov II

The doctrine of nullification, i.e., the idea that states have the right to unilaterally render void an act of the federal government that they perceive to be contrary to the Constitution, finds its origins in the writings of Thomas Jefferson, most notably his 1798 Kentucky Resolutions, written to protest the Federalist Congress’s passage of the Alien and Sedition Acts.

Thomas Jefferson’s Kentucky Resolutions claim that the U. S. Constitution was a compact among the several states-whereby the states delegated certain limited powers to the U.S. government; any undelegated power exercised by the U. S. government is thus void.


Serving Notice in New Mexico

New Mexico state representative Dennis Roch has introduced House Joint Resolution 27 to call on the Federal Government to “cease and desist” actions that go beyond the scope of powers authorized to it by the Constitution – and reserved to the States and the People by the 10th Amendment.

“A Joint Resolution claiming sovereignty under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States over certain powers; Serving Notice to the Federal Government to Cease and Desist certain mandates; Providing that certain Federal Legislation be prohibited or repealed.”


Saving Our American Republic

by Ray Bilger

The basic idea of the Founding Fathers was to get government as close to the people as possible. In other words, a small federal government, with strong local and state governments. Thomas Jefferson said, “When all government shall be drawn to Washington as the center of all power, it will… become as oppressive as the government from which we separated [ourselves, the government of England].”

Do you think that a bloated federal bureaucracy might be at the root of the problems we are facing today in our American Republic? Our nation’s Founders never dreamed that the federal government would become the octopus that it is, with its tentacles reaching into every facet of our lives. Is there a solution? Yes, and it’s already happening now!


Kentucky Resolutions Redux

On 02/24/09, Kentucky State Representative, John Will Stacy (D) intrduced House Concurrent Resolution 168, which reads:

“A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION claiming sovereignty over powers not granted to the federal government by the United States Constitution; serving notice to the federal government to cease mandates beyond its authority; and stating Kentucky’s position that federal legislation that requires states to comply under threat of loss of federal funding should be prohibited or repealed.”

For those history buffs out there, Kentucky was at the forefront in asserting the principles of State Sovereignty in the early days of the Republic.   The Kentucky Resolutions of 1798 took what some consider to be the strongest position on this issue in our history.

Here’s an excerpt:


The Constitution or Liberty

by Sheldon Richman, Foundation for Economic Education

“Each state retains its sovereignty, freedom, and independence, and every power, jurisdiction, and right, which is not by this Confederation expressly delegated to the United States, in Congress assembled.”

We might think those words—or words to the same effect—are in the U.S. Constitution. But they are not. They are from Article II of the Articles of Confederation, America’s first constitution. They could have been placed in the U.S. Constitution but were deliberately left out in 1787.


Indiana Legislators Urge Feds to “Cease and Desist”

Legislators in Indiana have introduced Senate Concurrent Resolution 0037:

“A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION urging the honorable Barack Obama, President of the United States, the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives of the United States, in Congress assembled, and the President of the Senate and Speaker of the House of Representatives of each State’s legislature of the United States of America to cease and desist, effective immediately, any and all mandates that are beyond the scope of their constitutionally delegated power.”