The Constitution (article VI, clause 3) requires that senators and representatives “be bound by oath or affirmation, to support this Constitution.” Do they?

U.S. law requires that members of Congress be sworn in before they can take their seats. Senators and representatives must “solemnly swear” that they “will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic,” and that they “will bear true faith and allegiance to the same.” Do they?

Regardless of any issues that libertarians have with the Constitution, it is the supreme law of the land that members of Congress are supposed to support, defend, and bear faith and allegiance to. Do they?

They certainly do not. Americans live in a vast welfare state that is not authorized by the Constitution. American live in a country with tremendous interference by the government in business, society, and the economy. I would even go so far to say that 95 percent of what the U.S. government does is unconstitutional.

Yet, the United States is very concerned about other countries following their constitutions.

In a speech at his alma mater—the University of Texas— on February 1, ahead of a five-nation Latin American tour, U.S. Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson declared that many people in Latin America “still live under the oppression of tyranny.” He then singled out the regime in Venezuela:

The corrupt and hostile regime of Nicolas Maduro in Venezuela clings to a false dream and antiquated vision for the region that has already failed its citizens. It does not represent the vision of millions of Venezuelans—or in any way comport with the norms of our Latin American, Canadian, or Ca