The Liberty Amendment

by Dr. Archie Jones, The American Vision

No fundamental provision of the Constitution or the Bill of Rights is more neglected—or thoroughly violated—today than the Tenth Amendment. It is violated in spirit and in practice. Its violation is advocated implicitly and explicitly: in the teaching of American history and government, in legal theory, in what passes for “Constitutional Law,” and in the functioning of everyday American politics and government.

Our Constitution—as the very words of the Tenth Amendment make clear—was intended to be a delegated powers document. The states which formed and ratified the Constitution were free and independent states—nations—which delegated certain authority and powers to the new central or national government created by the Constitution. They delegated—and manifestly intended to delegate—only those powers stated in the Constitution: and no more. They forbade themselves certain other powers which they also stated in Article I, Section 10 of the Constitution.

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The Basics of Sound Government

by State Rep. Dick Harwood, Idaho-St. Maries

It might seem strange that the Legislature is considering action to declare Idaho’s sovereignty under the 10th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. State sovereignty should be a given.

Yet, it isn’t. “Change” is the latest buzzword in politics; that’s what President Obama campaigned for when he ran for office and since he took office in January. He wants “change” in the political climate in Washington and “change” in how business is conducted.

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Mississippi: Reinforcing the 10th Amendment

On March 5th, 2009, legislators in Mississippi introduced House Concurrent Resolution 69 (HC0069) to “reinforce the fundamental principle and authority of State Sovereignty under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution…”

Steven Palazzo is the principle author of the resolution along with 29 additional authors – find status updates here.

Here’s the full text of the resolution:

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Reasserting Sovereignty in South Dakota

Legislators in South Dakota have introduced House Concurrent Resolution 1013  (h/t R Rivers):

“A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION,  Reasserting sovereignty under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States over certain powers and serving notice to the federal government to cease and desist certain mandates.”

Although just introduced, this resolution seems to have quite a bit of legislative support – with nearly 43 Representatives and 17 Senators Signing on.

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