10th Amendment: History and Purpose

by Justin D. Lowry, Georgia Conservative Weekly

The purpose of the 10th Amendment is to define the establishment and division of power between the Federal government and state governments. This amendment also protects these powers from both entities. This amendment was used to define the federal taxing power, federal police power, and federal regulations.

At one time, it was read very simply, if it is not in the constitution, the federal government could not pass it to the states. Through the years, the power of the federal government has expanded through the Supreme Court.

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State Sovereignty Resolutions

Click the colored icons on this map, or scroll down for a text list of current State Sovereignty Resolutions.

Legend: Blue – Introduced. Yellow – Passed one or more houses. Green – Passed Both Houses. Red – Failed Vote.

View State Sovereignty Resolutions in a larger map

Many of you have asked for a central location to stay up to date with state sovereignty bills. While the idea of centralizing information and/or control over a movement of this kind seems to fly in the face of the principles of decentralization that the Tenth Amendment Center stands for, we have gladly succumbed to popular demand with this informational post.

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Arkansas: State Sovereignty Bill Filed

by Jason Tolbert, The Tolbert Report

HCR1011, a resolution affirming the sovereignty of the state of Arkansas under the 10th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was filed this afternoon by Rep. Debra Hobbs (R-Rogers). The resolution goes on to say that this is to serve as “Notice and Demand to the federal government, as our agent, to cease and desist, effective immediately, mandates that are beyond the scope of these constitutionally delegated powers.”

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Tennessee Sovereignty Resolution

Legislators in Tennessee submitted House Joint Resolution 108 (HJR0108) on February 18th.  While it’s  non-binding, some of the language is quite well put.  Here’s the intro:

A RESOLUTION to affirm Tennessee’s sovereignty under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States and to demand the federal government halt its practice of assuming powers and of imposing mandates upon the states for purposes not enumerated by the Constitution of the United States.

Halting the practice of assuming powers not enumerated is a great step.  Rolling back all the previous unconstitutional legislation is also a must in the future.

Here’s the rest of the bill:

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Minnesota Legislators Join the Fight

This morning, legislators from the state of Minnesota introduced HF No. 997, with the following description:

“Federal government memorialized to halt its practice of imposing mandates upon the states for purposes not enumerated by the Constitution of the United States and affirming Minnesota’s sovereignty under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. “

There are 16 co-authors to the bill, and you can find more details here.

Read the full text:

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Standing up for States Rights

by State Rep. Jason Murphey (OK-31)

The steps taken in the past few days by Congress to give the federal government nearly 800 billion dollars worth of increased power reminds me of a column I wrote last November. In that article I wrote about the expected expansion of the federal government and how I felt the issue of state’s rights could once again be a significant issue in the Oklahoma Legislature this year.

It is important to note that in comparison to state governments, the federal government was created by our founders to be small and limited. This is because the people have a much stronger voice at the state level, whereas the ability of people to effect change is greatly limited at the federal level, and nearly non-existent on the global level of government.

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Oklahoma Sovereignty Resolution Passes Committee

Writes Matt Hawes: House Joint Resolution 1003, Oklahoma State Rep. Charles Key’s resolution affirming Oklahoma’s sovereignty under the Tenth Amendment, passed unanimously in committee yesterday!  It should be scheduled for a floor hearing soon. A number of state legislators have introduced similiar resolutions in their states, and it is good to see some progress being…

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