Serving Notice in New Mexico

New Mexico state representative Dennis Roch has introduced House Joint Resolution 27 to call on the Federal Government to “cease and desist” actions that go beyond the scope of powers authorized to it by the Constitution – and reserved to the States and the People by the 10th Amendment.

“A Joint Resolution claiming sovereignty under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States over certain powers; Serving Notice to the Federal Government to Cease and Desist certain mandates; Providing that certain Federal Legislation be prohibited or repealed.”

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Reasserting Sovereignty in South Dakota

Legislators in South Dakota have introduced House Concurrent Resolution 1013  (h/t R Rivers):

“A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION,  Reasserting sovereignty under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States over certain powers and serving notice to the federal government to cease and desist certain mandates.”

Although just introduced, this resolution seems to have quite a bit of legislative support – with nearly 43 Representatives and 17 Senators Signing on.

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Why Georgia Should Declare Sovereignty

by Justin D. Lowry, Georgia Conservative Weekly

There comes a time in a nation’s course when the citizenry must question its government’s intentions. When we elect our officials, we hire them for their term; therefore, as they represent us, they should listen to us. There is a problem with a citizenry that allows its government to do their thinking for them. There is also a problem with a government that believes it knows what is best for the citizenry.

This government has the belief that the populace is too stupid, lazy, or indifferent to take care of themselves. The populace has a belief that since they elected them, they know better than they do, thus should take care of them. A free people cannot be free with both of these beliefs.

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Saving Our American Republic

by Ray Bilger

The basic idea of the Founding Fathers was to get government as close to the people as possible. In other words, a small federal government, with strong local and state governments. Thomas Jefferson said, “When all government shall be drawn to Washington as the center of all power, it will… become as oppressive as the government from which we separated [ourselves, the government of England].”

Do you think that a bloated federal bureaucracy might be at the root of the problems we are facing today in our American Republic? Our nation’s Founders never dreamed that the federal government would become the octopus that it is, with its tentacles reaching into every facet of our lives. Is there a solution? Yes, and it’s already happening now!

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Virginia Resolution Redux

On 02-26-09, a number of Virginia State Representative intrduced House Resolution 61, which reads:

RESOLVED by the House of Delegates, That the Congress of the United States be urged to honor state sovereignty under the Tenth Amendment of the Constitution of the United States. The Commonwealth of Virginia hereby claims sovereignty under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States over all powers not otherwise enumerated and granted to the federal government by the Constitution of the United States. The Commonwealth by this resolution serves notice to the federal government, as our agent, to cease and desist, effective immediately, mandates that are beyond the scope of these constitutionally delegated powers. Further, the Commonwealth urges that all compulsory federal legislation that directs states to comply under threat of civil or criminal penalties or sanctions or requires states to pass legislation or lose federal funding shall be prohibited or repealed.

For those history buffs out there, Virginia (along with Kentucky) was at the forefront in asserting the principles of State Sovereignty and limited government in the early days of the Republic. The Virginia Resolution of 1798, authored by James Madison in collaboration with Thomas Jefferson, took what some consider to be the strongest position on this issue in our history.

Here’s an excerpt:

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Might Does Not Make Right

by Scott McPherson, LewRockwell.com

To the victor go the spoils, and the winners write the history books, this latter coming unavoidably with the former. Still, facts persist, despite their inconvenience.

One fact that seems particularly inconvenient to the editors of New Hampshire’s Nashua Telegraph is that the government of the United States is a limited government. Their specific complaint is against “HCR6,” a resolution introduced in the New Hampshire House of Representatives re-affirming the principles laid out in the Tenth Amendment of the US Constitution, namely, that the federal government exists to exercise delegated powers only, and that all other powers are retained by the states and the people.

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Kentucky Resolutions Redux

On 02/24/09, Kentucky State Representative, John Will Stacy (D) intrduced House Concurrent Resolution 168, which reads:

“A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION claiming sovereignty over powers not granted to the federal government by the United States Constitution; serving notice to the federal government to cease mandates beyond its authority; and stating Kentucky’s position that federal legislation that requires states to comply under threat of loss of federal funding should be prohibited or repealed.”

For those history buffs out there, Kentucky was at the forefront in asserting the principles of State Sovereignty in the early days of the Republic.   The Kentucky Resolutions of 1798 took what some consider to be the strongest position on this issue in our history.

Here’s an excerpt:

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Indiana Legislators Urge Feds to “Cease and Desist”

Legislators in Indiana have introduced Senate Concurrent Resolution 0037:

“A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION urging the honorable Barack Obama, President of the United States, the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives of the United States, in Congress assembled, and the President of the Senate and Speaker of the House of Representatives of each State’s legislature of the United States of America to cease and desist, effective immediately, any and all mandates that are beyond the scope of their constitutionally delegated power.”

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