Alaska Resolution: Sovereignty Under the 10th Amendment

Legislators in Alaska introduced House Resolution 9 on 02-25-09.  It reads:

WHEREAS the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States reads,  “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people”; and

WHEREAS the Tenth Amendment defines the total scope of federal power as being that specifically granted by the Constitution of the United States and no more; and


Standing up for Liberty

by Ray Bilger

The conclusion of my last article read, “If there is any hope for America, it lies with We The People taking back our country from the crooks and criminals in Wash., D.C. who are running our country into the ground… There is a new hope for America… and it involves the States and the People working together, as the Founders intended, to make the America of all our dreams.”

The State governments of the original Thirteen States of the United States of America established the federal government to act as their agent in a world of interdependent nations.  Those original Thirteen States did not have to establish a federal government, but because those states collectively wanted to be represented to the world as one whole nation of States, they chose to have an agent, our federal government, to represent the collective interests of the several States.  Thus, the federal government, as our agent, is at all times accountable to the States, and to We The People!


The States’ Rights Tradition Nobody Knows

In 1798, the legislatures of Virginia and Kentucky approved resolutions that affirmed the states’ right to resist federal encroachments on their powers. If the federal government has the exclusive right to judge the extent of its own powers, warned the resolutions’ authors (James Madison and Thomas Jefferson, respectively), it will continue to grow – regardless of elections, the separation of powers, and other much-touted limits on government power. The Virginia Resolutions spoke of the states’ right to “interpose” between the federal government and the people of the state; the Kentucky Resolutions (in a 1799 follow-up to the original resolutions) used the term “nullification” – the states, they said, could nullify unconstitutional federal laws.

These ideas became known as the “Principles of ’98.” Their subsequent impact on American history, according to the standard narrative, was pretty much confined to South Carolina’s nullification of the tariffs of 1828 and 1832. That is demonstrably false, as I shall show below. But it isn’t just that these ideas are neglected in the usual telling; as I discovered not long ago, these principles are positively despised by neoconservatives like Max Boot and the leftists at the New York Times (or do I repeat myself?). Neither one, in their reviews of The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History, so much as mentioned Jefferson’s name in connection with the Principles of ’98. It is hard to view such an omission as anything but deliberate. To mention Jefferson’s name is to lend legitimacy to ideas that nationalists of left and right alike detest, so they simply leave him out of the picture.


Serving Notice in New Mexico

New Mexico state representative Dennis Roch has introduced House Joint Resolution 27 to call on the Federal Government to “cease and desist” actions that go beyond the scope of powers authorized to it by the Constitution – and reserved to the States and the People by the 10th Amendment.

“A Joint Resolution claiming sovereignty under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States over certain powers; Serving Notice to the Federal Government to Cease and Desist certain mandates; Providing that certain Federal Legislation be prohibited or repealed.”


Reasserting Sovereignty in South Dakota

Legislators in South Dakota have introduced House Concurrent Resolution 1013  (h/t R Rivers):

“A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION,  Reasserting sovereignty under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States over certain powers and serving notice to the federal government to cease and desist certain mandates.”

Although just introduced, this resolution seems to have quite a bit of legislative support – with nearly 43 Representatives and 17 Senators Signing on.


Talking Sovereignty in Michigan

The Tenth Amendment Center’s Michael Boldin recently appeared on Michigan’s WTCM Radio – Newstalk 580 in Traverse City – to talk about the growing State Sovereignty movement, the Tenth Amendment Center, and the need for limited government.  The interview is about 26 minutes, and you can listen by clicking the link below.


Why Georgia Should Declare Sovereignty

by Justin D. Lowry, Georgia Conservative Weekly

There comes a time in a nation’s course when the citizenry must question its government’s intentions. When we elect our officials, we hire them for their term; therefore, as they represent us, they should listen to us. There is a problem with a citizenry that allows its government to do their thinking for them. There is also a problem with a government that believes it knows what is best for the citizenry.

This government has the belief that the populace is too stupid, lazy, or indifferent to take care of themselves. The populace has a belief that since they elected them, they know better than they do, thus should take care of them. A free people cannot be free with both of these beliefs.


Saving Our American Republic

by Ray Bilger

The basic idea of the Founding Fathers was to get government as close to the people as possible. In other words, a small federal government, with strong local and state governments. Thomas Jefferson said, “When all government shall be drawn to Washington as the center of all power, it will… become as oppressive as the government from which we separated [ourselves, the government of England].”

Do you think that a bloated federal bureaucracy might be at the root of the problems we are facing today in our American Republic? Our nation’s Founders never dreamed that the federal government would become the octopus that it is, with its tentacles reaching into every facet of our lives. Is there a solution? Yes, and it’s already happening now!


Virginia Resolution Redux

On 02-26-09, a number of Virginia State Representative intrduced House Resolution 61, which reads:

RESOLVED by the House of Delegates, That the Congress of the United States be urged to honor state sovereignty under the Tenth Amendment of the Constitution of the United States. The Commonwealth of Virginia hereby claims sovereignty under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States over all powers not otherwise enumerated and granted to the federal government by the Constitution of the United States. The Commonwealth by this resolution serves notice to the federal government, as our agent, to cease and desist, effective immediately, mandates that are beyond the scope of these constitutionally delegated powers. Further, the Commonwealth urges that all compulsory federal legislation that directs states to comply under threat of civil or criminal penalties or sanctions or requires states to pass legislation or lose federal funding shall be prohibited or repealed.

For those history buffs out there, Virginia (along with Kentucky) was at the forefront in asserting the principles of State Sovereignty and limited government in the early days of the Republic. The Virginia Resolution of 1798, authored by James Madison in collaboration with Thomas Jefferson, took what some consider to be the strongest position on this issue in our history.

Here’s an excerpt:


Might Does Not Make Right

by Scott McPherson,

To the victor go the spoils, and the winners write the history books, this latter coming unavoidably with the former. Still, facts persist, despite their inconvenience.

One fact that seems particularly inconvenient to the editors of New Hampshire’s Nashua Telegraph is that the government of the United States is a limited government. Their specific complaint is against “HCR6,” a resolution introduced in the New Hampshire House of Representatives re-affirming the principles laid out in the Tenth Amendment of the US Constitution, namely, that the federal government exists to exercise delegated powers only, and that all other powers are retained by the states and the people.