And the War Rages On

Just focusing on the economics of it all, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are estimated to cost nearly $200 Billion in 2008. And, if we assume the government will act like it normally does, you can expect that price tag to be far, far higher than what they claim it will be.


Iraq: The Divine Right of Kings Lives On?

Cindy Sheehan, writing in an article titled At What Price, Safety? at Buzzflash today made some excellent points arguing against the use of aggression by the US military against the people of Iraq. She, like many others, realizes that the illusion of security that the federal government claims to provide could never justify its current actions – killing, violations of liberty and the like.


The Military Draft: A Moral Abomination

by Michael Boldin

An article in Newsweek, “Why We Need a Draft: A Marine’s Lament,” stirred up a bit of a hornet’s nest online recently. It was written by marine who fought in Fallujah, Iraq, and actually gave a pretty compelling overview of the practical need for selective service.

I’m sure the marine was right – forcing you or other people to kill or be killed next to him would have been good in the battles he fought in. In fact, I don’t doubt that a few million more soldiers would be quite beneficial to the military – and to the foreign policy ambitions of the US government.

On the other hand, many Americans also persuasively argue against the draft, saying it’s unnecessary or ineffective in defending America or engaging in foreign interventions. These arguments might very well be sound, and have their place.


Undeclared War and the Destruction of the Constitution

In reading the Constitution, we can plainly see that Congress possesses the power “to regulate commerce with foreign nations, to raise and support armies, to grant letters of marque and reprisal, to provide for the common defense,” and even “to declare war.” Congress shares, with the President, the power to make treaties and to appoint ambassadors. As for the Executive, the President is assigned only two powers relating to foreign affairs; commander-in-chief of the armed forces, and the power to receive ambassadors.


New Law Could Subject Civilians to Military Trial

The Washington Post Reports: Private contractors and other civilians serving with U.S. troops in Iraq and Afghanistan could be subject for the first time to military courts-martial under a new federal provision that legal scholars say is almost certain to spark constitutional challenges. Challenges?? We the people shouldn’t simply “challenge” but instead, make strong demands…