Texas, Missouri Join Other States Looking To Block Gun Bans

For Immediate Release: Jan. 16, 2013gun_grab

States have opportunity to say ‘No!’ to gun grabs

On the same day President Obama called for a ban on assault weapons and high capacity magazines, a Texas legislator filed a bill asserting, “Not in my state!”

On Wednesday, the Lone Star State joined five other states already considering legislation that would block enforcement federal firearms acts in violation of the Second Amendment.

Texas Rep. John Otto (R-Dayton) announced the filing of HB553 on Wednesday morning. The bill would make it a misdemeanor for any state or federal official to “enforce or attempt to enforce any acts, laws, executive orders, agency orders, rules or regulations of any kind whatsoever of the United States government relating to confiscating any firearm, banning any firearm, limiting the size of a magazine for any firearm, imposing any limit on the ammunition that may be purchased for any firearm, taxing any firearm or ammunition therefore, or requiring the registration of any firearm or ammunition therefore.”

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BREAKING: Michigan House passes bill blocking NDAA detention

Contact: Mike Maharrey Communications director O: 213.935.0553 [email protected] www.tenthamendmentcenter.com For Immediate Release:Dec. 5, 2012 A bill condemning detention provisions written into the National Defense Authorization Act and blocking any state cooperation with federal agents attempting to detain people in Michigan without due process unanimously passed the Michigan House Wednesday. HB5768 declares, “no agency of this…

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Six states defy feds

Voters in Alabama, Montana, and Wyoming all passed measures guaranteeing health care freedom, despite federal mandates in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Massachusetts voters defied federal law and approved a measure to legalize marijuana for medicinal use. And in Washington and Colorado, they took it a step further, decriminalizing pot completely.

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What next? Nullify!

On Thursday, the Supreme Court sent shockwaves across America, upholding the constitutionality of the federal health care act.

Tenth Amendment Center executive director Michael Boldin said it didn’t surprise him one bit.

“The federal government always expands its own power. The Supreme Court is part of the federal government. I don’t see what’s so shocking here. It’s sad, but not surprising. By ruling, once again, that uniform policies must reign over a nation of 50 states and 300 million people, the Supreme Court has continued its attack on the last vestiges of what’s supposed to make this country great.”

The Court argued that the federal government cannot enforce a mandate through the commerce clause, but it can impose a tax on those who choose not to purchase health insurance. TAC communications director Mike Maharrey called the focus on the mandate “misplaced.”

“The Supreme Court says the federal government can’t force you to do something through a mandate, but it can tax you for doing nothing in order to ‘encourage’ you into doing something. Sounds like Orwellian doublespeak to me. But the bottom line is that the federal government has no enumerated power to create a national health care system in the first place. The entire notion of federal health care is unconstitutional, even if you buy into this tax malarkey.”

And while many opponents of nationalized health care view the ruling as a bitter defeat, Maharrey says the Tenth Amendment Center sees a clear path forward.

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