The Nature of Change

by Justin D. Lowry, Georgia Conservative Weekly

Change is inevitable, and not all change is bad just as not all change is good. Government is a collection of law. Politics uses philosophy and theory. The way to test these is to compare them to events in history. If something didn’t work 100 years ago, it will not work now.

To put state sovereignty to this test, you will see that it worked for around 90-100 years. The Articles of Confederation clearly expressed states rights, and the Constitution gives states levels of autonomy.

Details

Why Georgia Should Declare Sovereignty

by Justin D. Lowry, Georgia Conservative Weekly

There comes a time in a nation’s course when the citizenry must question its government’s intentions. When we elect our officials, we hire them for their term; therefore, as they represent us, they should listen to us. There is a problem with a citizenry that allows its government to do their thinking for them. There is also a problem with a government that believes it knows what is best for the citizenry.

This government has the belief that the populace is too stupid, lazy, or indifferent to take care of themselves. The populace has a belief that since they elected them, they know better than they do, thus should take care of them. A free people cannot be free with both of these beliefs.

Details

Might Does Not Make Right

by Scott McPherson, LewRockwell.com

To the victor go the spoils, and the winners write the history books, this latter coming unavoidably with the former. Still, facts persist, despite their inconvenience.

One fact that seems particularly inconvenient to the editors of New Hampshire’s Nashua Telegraph is that the government of the United States is a limited government. Their specific complaint is against “HCR6,” a resolution introduced in the New Hampshire House of Representatives re-affirming the principles laid out in the Tenth Amendment of the US Constitution, namely, that the federal government exists to exercise delegated powers only, and that all other powers are retained by the states and the people.

Details

Why Do You Pay Taxes?

by William ‘BJ’ Lawson, UnitedLiberty.org

As various tax-related mail begins to appear in the mailboxes of hardworking Americans across the country, it’s instructive for all of us to reflect on why we carry the burden of our government every April.

Take this morning, for instance. We can credit the “ingenuity of the markets”, and specifically the ingenuity of John Thain, for moving annual executive bonus payments by Merrill Lynch up by a month last November, thus disbursing $15 billion in executive bonuses just before closing Merrill’s acquisition by Bank of America. Fast forward a few months, and the United States taxpayer just gave Bank of America another $20 billion in newly-borrowed funds to put a band-aid on mortar wounds in Merrill Lynch’s balance sheet.

Details

Oppose Implementation of The REAL ID Act

An open letter to Arnold Schwarzenegger

Dear Governor Schwarzenegger:

As a constituent who cares deeply about privacy and national security, I urge you to oppose implementation of the REAL ID Act and support its immediate repeal.

The creation of a national identification card is not a power delegated to Congress under Article I, section 8 of the United States Constitution, and violates the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution which states, “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people.”

Details

REAL ID: Real Resistance

Kudos to the Maine Legislature! InformationWeek Reports: Legislators in Maine have refused to implement the Real ID Act and are calling on Congress to repeal it. The Maine Senate and House of Representatives passed a joint resolution Thursday demanding the repeal of the law and announcing they were the first state lawmakers in the country…

Details