Ohio Senate Introduces Sovereignty Resolution

As reported by The Ohio Republic blog last week, Senate Concurrent Resolution 13 (SCR13) has been introduced in Ohio – it’s goal is to “claim sovereignty over certain powers pursuant to the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America, to notify Congress to limit and end certain mandates, and to insist that federal legislation contravening the Tenth Amendment be prohibited or repealed.”

The resolution is sponsored by Senators Keith Faber (R-Celina) and Timothy Grendell (R-Chesterland), and cosponsored by Senators Gibbs, Buehrer, Cates, Hughes, Schuler, and Schuring.

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Trampling the Constitutional Role of Regulation

Prior to 1937, Congress’s role in the regulation of commerce was quite simply defined as the “movement of goods” between states, and put most production and manufacturing outside of the regulatory power of Congress. This definition has essentially been abandoned ever since the Supreme Court, in 1937, upheld an act allowing Congress to regulate many aspects of labor through the National Labor Relations Board.

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Obama and US Congress: maybe REAL ID needs changes

Congress and the Obama administration are considering ceding key ground in a long-running battle between the federal government and the states over Real ID, the 4-year-old federal program that requires all states to start issuing more secure driver’s licenses by the end of the year. Proposed legislation being circulated on Capitol Hill would give states more time, flexibility and money to meet federal Real ID requirements.

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Mississippi Lawmakers Approve Sovereignty Resolutions

Mississippi lawmakers have voted to approve House and Senate versions of resolutions in support of State Sovereignty. The House adopted its resolution on a vote of 80-30 after two hours of debate – and it was altered to specify that the resolution shouldn’t be interpreted as an official stance against voting rights. The Senate adopted its own resolution, 25-18, after about an hour and a half. The sponsors of the Mississippi resolutions were Republicans or conservative Democrats.

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